MEREDITH HAMILTON

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Publishing Hackathon

Designed a three dimensional on line browser to encourage serendipitous book discovery

What I did

•Compared book browsing in brick and mortar stores to existing online experiences

•Prototyped a radically different browser using D3, a Javascript library for visualizing data

The Hackathon Challenge

“Book discovery needs innovation. It’s never been easier to get a book into a reader’s hands—just one click. But, with over 200,000 books published each year on every topic imaginable, how do people find out about them?”
—Pearson Publishing

I Delivered

1. Research

Comparison of browsing experiences

At conventional bookstores, people move through physical space, passing shelves and tables laden with books. There is chance of accidental discovery. Barnes & Noble bookstores capitalize on this by consistently placing children’s sections deep into their stores, so that parents may discover books along their path.
Online book stores are often time-centered, designed to help people find what they want, fast. Their interfaces are gridded, two-dimensional, and rely on filters to target searches. This efficiency discourages random book discovery.
Edward Tufte says that “It is better to have information adjacent in space than stacked in time.”
 
 
 
 

2. Prototype

A different online browsing experience

From my sketchbook: early iterations of a non-linear and three-dimensional browsing experience.
I made mockups of what the browser might look like if created in D3, a JavaScript library. A fisheye projection makes it possible to see micro and macro views simultaneously.

I Delivered

1. Research

Comparison of browsing experiences

At conventional bookstores, people move through physical space, passing shelves and tables laden with books. There is chance of accidental discovery. Barnes & Noble bookstores capitalize on this by consistently placing children’s sections deep into their stores, so that parents may discover books along their path.
Online book stores are often time-centered, designed to help people find what they want, fast. Their interfaces are gridded, two-dimensional, and rely on filters to target searches. This efficiency discourages random book discovery.
“It is better to have information adjacent in space than stacked in time.”
—Edward Tufte

2. Prototype

A different online browsing experience

From my sketchbook: early iterations of a non-linear and three-dimensional browsing experience.
I made mockups of what the browser might look like if created in D3, a JavaScript library. A fisheye projection makes it possible to see micro and macro views simultaneously.